Content tagged with: Cote D'Ivoire

 

The majority of perpetrators of reported incidents of economic violence in the in the four targeted districts for constituency-level observations were men. In no reported incidents were women the sole perpetrators or victims. This graph shows the gender of the victims and perpetrators, as well as the breakdown of incidents.

On Election Day, POECI’s national-level observers in Côte d’Ivoire reported only 4 critical incidents of economic violence where election materials for a candidate, civil society group or political party were defaced or otherwise damaged. This graph shows the gender of the victims and perpetrators, as well as the number of incidents reported at the national level. In no reported incidents were women the sole perpetrators or victims.

POECI observers in the four targeted districts for constituency-level observations reported a total of 19 critical incidents of intimidation, harassment or violence. This graph shows the gender of the perpetrators and victims of these incidents. From this graph, it is easier to see that while men and women experienced incidents of violence at relatively similar levels, more incidents involved women as victims rather than perpetrators, whereas the reverse is true for men.

On Election Day, POECI’s national-level observers in Côte d’Ivoire reported only 27 total incidents of intimidation, harassment or violence. This graph shows the gender of the victims and perpetrators; as well as the breakdown of incidents of intimidation, harassment or violence reported. Of these incidents, the majority of perpetrators were men.

During the Pre-Election Observation, the observers in Côte d’Ivoire reported only seven critical incidents of intimidation, harassment or violence. This graph shows the gender of the victims and perpetrators that occurred at a rally or assembly. There were no reported incidents in which women were the sole victims or perpetrators of reported incidents of intimidation, harassment.

 

During the voter registration period, there were almost no reported incidents of women voters being coerced or forced to vote a certain way. This reflected the broader trend that observers reported: that they witnessed or heard of almost no violence against political actors or their sympathizers for their political beliefs, or calls for violence against them.

 

During the pre-election period, very few observers reported incidents of economic violence, including destruction of property or campaign materials belonging to candidates or their supporters. This graph shows the very small number of incidents that was reported; the reports did not indicate that women candidates or supporters were targeted directly.

During the pre-election period, very few observers reported incidents of economic violence, including destruction of property or campaign materials belonging to candidates or their supporters. This graph shows the very small number of incidents that was reported; the reports did not indicate that women candidates or supporters were targeted directly.

Women have a right to participate in any electoral role that is open to their fellow men. However, around the world, women are still underrepresented as voters, election officials, candidates and election observers. The Votes Without Violence project took a close look at the numbers of women that observers reported participating in elections in all capacities: overwhelmingly, women's participation levels still come in lower when compared to their fellow male citizens.

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Electoral violence undermines democratic elections, which are a cornerstone of democratic governance. Violence against women in elections is a particular form of electoral violence, motivated by a desire to prevent women from participating in the electoral process, which sees women attacked for daring to participate in elections. Learn More About Votes Without Violence